Descendants of William Hayward

 

Generation 1

 

1.      WILLIAM1 HAYWARD was born on 06 Feb 1617 in London, England. He died on 10 May 1659 in Braintree, MA. He married Margery Knight on 10 Oct 1633 in Stepney, England. She was born in 1611 in London, England. She died on 18 Jul 1676 in Braintree, MA. William is my 9th Great Grandfather.  I descend from two of William’s children.

 

William Hayward and Margery Knight had the following children:

 

                  i.        JOHN2 HAYWARD was born on 13 Nov 1634 in London, England.

 

3.               ii.   JONATHAN HAYWARD was born in 1641 in London, England. He died on 21 Nov 1690 in Braintree, MA. He married Sarah Thayer, daughter of Thomas Thayer and Hannah Unknown on 06 May 1663 in Braintree, MA. She was born about 1644. She died after May 1692.

 

4.               iii.  SAMUEL HAYWARD was born on 04 Jan 1643 in Braintree, MA. He died on 29 Jul 1713 in Mendon, MA. He married (1) MEHETIBEL THOMPSON, daughter of John Thompson and Sarah Unknown on 28 Nov 1666 in Braintree, MA. She died before 1701. He married (2) ELIZABETH SABIN on 12 Jan 1701 in Mendon, MA.

 

5.               iv.  WILLIAM HAYWARD was born in 1648 in London, England. He died on 17 Dec 1718 in Massachusetts. He married SARAH BUTTERWORTH. She was born on 08 Apr 1652 in Rehoboth, MA.

 

                   v.     ROBERT HAYWARD was born in Braintree, MA. He died in 1683.

 

5.               vi.   HULDAH HAYWARD was born on 07 Oct 1636 in London, England. She died on 01 Sep 1690 in Mendon, MA. She married Ferdinando Thayer on 14 Jan 1653.

 

Generation 2

 

2.      JONATHAN2 HAYWARD (William1) was born in 1641 in London, England. He died on 21 Nov 1690 in Braintree, MA. He married Sarah Thayer, daughter of Thomas Thayer and Hannah Unknown on 06 May 1663 in Braintree, MA. She was born about 1644. She died after May 1692.

 

Jonathan Hayward and Sarah Thayer had the following children:

 

i.        HANNAH3 HAYWARD was born on 22 Feb 1664 in Braintree, MA. She married (1) CAPT JOHN MILLS in 1686 in Braintree, MA. She married (2) WILLIAM THAYER on 22 Sep 1699 in Braintree, MA.

 

ii.       SARAH HAYWARD was born on 10 Mar 1666 in Braintree, MA. She died on 30 May 1676 in Braintree, MA.

 

7.               iii. JONATHAN HAYWARD was born on 18 Jan 1661 in Braintree, Norfolk Co, MA. He died on 13 Jul 1757 in Braintree, MA. He married HANNAH HOBART. She was born on 10 Dec 1668. She died before 1704. He married (2) SARAH RUGGLES, daughter of John Ruggles and Rebecca Farnsworth on 05 Oct 1704 in Braintree, MA. She was born on 21 Feb 1678. She died before 1707 in Braintree, MA. He married SUSANNA MILLS. She was born on 23 Oct 1675.

 

iv.      WILLIAM HAYWARD was born on 06 Feb 1670 in Braintree, MA. He died on 25 Mar 1697 in Easton, MA.

 

v.       HULDAH HAYWARD was born on 23 May 1672 in Braintree, MA. She married John Baxter on 24 Jan 1693.

 

vi.      SAMUEL HAYWARD was born on 02 Mar 1676 in Braintree, MA. He died on 04 Aug 1676 in Braintree, MA.

vii.     DEBORAH HAYWARD was born in 1678 in Braintree, MA. She died on 23 Feb 1759.

 

viii.    SARAH HAYWARD was born on 12 Dec 1679 in Braintree, MA. She died on 23 Jun 1684.

 

ix.      SAMUEL HAYWARD was born on 11 Apr 1682 in Braintree, MA. He died in 1745.

 

x.       BENJAMIN HAYWARD was born about 1685 in Braintree, MA.

 

xi.      SARAH HAYWARD was born on 17 Dec 1688 in Braintree, MA. She married Nathaniel Storry on 13 Jul 1724 in Braintree, MA.

 

3.      SAMUEL2 HAYWARD (William1) was born on 04 Jan 1643 in Braintree, MA. He died on 29 Jul 1713 in Mendon, MA. He married (1) MEHETIBEL THOMPSON, daughter of John Thompson and Sarah Unknown on 28 Nov 1666 in Braintree, MA. She died before 1701. He married (2) ELIZABETH SABIN on 12 Jan 1701 in Mendon, MA.

 

Samuel Hayward and Mehetibel Thompson had the following children:

 

7.               i. WILLIAM3 HAYWARD was born on 06 Oct 1667 in recorded in Mendon, MA. He married HESTER HARBOR. He married SARAH UNKNOWN.

 

ii.       MEHETIBEL HAYWARD. She married ABRAHAM STAPLES. She married NICHOLAS COOK.

 

iii.      MARY HAYWARD.  She married Joseph Rockwood in 1688.

 

iv.      HULDAH HAYWARD.  She married BENJAMIN BUTTERWORTH.

 

v.       MARGERY HAYWARD.  She married Jacob Aldrich on 15 Sep 1699 in Mendon, MA.

 

vi.      SARAH HAYWARD was born on 29 Oct 1677 in Braintree, MA. She married Benjamin Thayer on 15 Sep 1699 in Mendon, MA.

 

vii.     HANNAH HAYWARD was born on 18 Aug 1680 in Mendon, MA. She died in 1746. She married PETER ALDRICH. She married (2) BENJAMIN THAYER on 20 Dec 1712 in Mendon, MA.

 

viii.    DEBORAH HAYWARD was born on 09 Nov 1682 in Mendon, MA. She married Seth Aldrich on 03 Sep 1700.

 

ix.      SAMUEL HAYWARD was born on 07 Feb 1684 in Mendon, MA. He died on 16 May 1708 in Mendon, MA.

 

x.       JONATHAN HAYWARD was born on 10 Oct 1686 in Mendon, MA.

 

xi.      EXPERIENCE HAYWARD was born on 01 Mar 1688 in Mendon, MA.

 

xii.     BENJAMIN HAYWARD was born on 14 Feb 1689 in Mendon, MA.

 

xiii.    BETHIA HAYWARD.  She married William Boyce on 14 Apr 1715 in Medway, MA.

 

4.      WILLIAM2 HAYWARD (William1) was born in 1648 in London, England. He died on 17 Dec 1718 in Massachusetts. He married SARAH BUTTERWORTH. She was born on 08 Apr 1652 in Rehoboth, MA.

 

William Hayward and Sarah Butterworth had the following children:

 

i.        JONATHAN3 HAYWARD was born on 08 Apr 1672 in MA.

 

ii.       MARGERY HAYWARD was born on 10 Sep 1673 in MA.

 

iii.      SARA HAYWARD was born on 02 Aug 1676 in MA.

 

iv.      MARCY HAYWARD was born on 09 Jun 1678 in MA.

 

    8.               v. WILLIAM HAYWARD was born on 30 Jan 1680 in Mendon, MA. He died in 1736 in Bellingham, MA. He married (1) SARAH INGALS on 07 Aug 1707 in

                      Mendon, MA. She was born in Mendon, MA (Swansea). He married UNKNOWN.

 

vi.      SAMUEL HAYWARD was born on 19 May 1683 in MA.

 

vii.     HULDAH HAYWARD was born on 13 Mar 1685 in MA.

 

viii.    OLIVER HAYWARD was born on 17 Mar 1687 in MA.

 

ix.      HANNAH HAYWARD was born on 11 Mar 1689 in MA. She married Benjamin Thayer, son of Ferdinando Thayer and Huldah Hayward on 20 Dec 1712 in MA.

 

x.       CONTENT HAYWARD was born on 20 Dec 1699 in MA.

 

5.      HULDAH2 HAYWARD (William1) was born on 07 Oct 1636 in London, England. She died on 01 Sep 1690 in Mendon, MA. She married Ferdinando Thayer on 14 Jan 1653.

 

Ferdinando Thayer and Huldah Hayward had the following child:

 

i.        BENJAMIN THAYER. He married Hannah Hayward, daughter of William Hayward and Sarah Butterworth on 20 Dec 1712 in MA. She was born on 11 Mar 1689 in MA.

 

Generation 3

 

6.      JONATHAN3 HAYWARD (Jonathan2, William1) was born on 18 Jan 1661 in Braintree, Norfolk Co, MA. He died on 13 Jul 1757 in Braintree, MA. He married HANNAH HOBART. She was born on 10 Dec 1668. She died before 1704. He married (2) SARAH RUGGLES, daughter of John Ruggles and Rebecca Farnsworth on 05 Oct 1704 in Braintree, MA. She was born on 21 Feb 1678. She died before 1707 in Braintree, MA. He married SUSANNA MILLS. She was born on 23 Oct 1675.

 

Jonathan Hayward and Hannah Hobart had the following children:

 

i.        HANNAH4 HAYWARD was born on 22 Jan 1693 in Braintree, MA.

 

10.                  ii.   JONATHAN HAYWARD was born on 29 Dec 1694 in Braintree, MA. He married Mary Savel on 14 Jan 1720 in Braintree, MA. She was born on 22 Aug 1694.

 

iii.      CALEB HAYWARD was born on 27 Sep 1696 in Braintree, MA.

 

iv.      JOSHUA HAYWARD was born on 26 May 1699 in Braintree, MA.

 

v.       MARY HAYWARD was born on 05 Jun 1701 in Braintree, MA. She married Jeremiah Belcher on 23 Jun 1726 in Braintree, MA.

 

Jonathan Hayward and Sarah Ruggles had the following child:

 

10.            vi. SARAH HAYWARD was born on 19 Oct 1705 in Braintree, Norfolk Co, Ma. She died after 26 Sep 1782. She married (1) THOMAS (DEACON) WALES, son of Nathaniel Wales and Joanna Faxon on 07 Sep 1742 in Braintree, Norfolk Co, Ma. He was born on 19 Apr 1695 in Braintree, Norfolk Co, MA. He died in 1775 in Braintree, Norfolk Co, MA. She married (2) SAMUEL (SGT) BELCHER on 13 Jan 1725/26 in Braintree, Norfolk Co, Ma. He was born on 19 Aug 1699 in Braintree, Norfolk Co, Ma. He died on 21 Jun 1738 in Quincy, Norfolk, MA (Belcher Tomb, Hancock Cem, Quincy, MA).

 

7.      WILLIAM3 HAYWARD (Samuel2, William1) was born on 06 Oct 1667 in recorded in Mendon, MA. He married HESTER HARBOR. He married SARAH UNKNOWN.

 

William Hayward and Hester Harbor had the following children:

 

   11.            i. WILLIAM4 HAYWARD was born on 25 Mar 1694 in Mendon, MA. He died on 06 Feb 1790 in Sturbridge, MA. He married Elizabeth Gibbs on 16 May 1717 in Framingham, MA. She died on 13 Feb 1776 in Upton, MA.

 

ii.       SAMUEL HAYWARD was born on 22 Nov 1696 in Mendon, MA.

 

iii.      JOHN HAYWARD was born on 13 Jun 1700 in Mendon, MA.

 

iv.      HESTER HAYWARD was born on 30 Mar 1702 in Mendon, MA.

 

v.       MEHETIBEL HAYWARD was born on 07 Apr 1703 in Mendon, MA.

 

William Hayward and Sarah Unknown had the following child:

 

vi.      SARAH HAYWARD was born on 02 May 1708 in Mendon, MA. She married James Smith on 21 Nov 1728 in Bellingham, MA.

 

8.      WILLIAM3 HAYWARD (William2, William1) was born on 30 Jan 1680 in Mendon, MA. He died in 1736 in Bellingham, MA. He married (1) SARAH INGALS on 07 Aug 1707 in Mendon, MA. She was born in Mendon, MA (Swansea). He married UNKNOWN.

 

William Hayward and Sarah Ingals had the following children:

 

i.        SARAH4 HAYWARD was born on 02 May 1708 in Mendon, MA. She married James Smith on 21 Nov 1728 in Bellingham, MA.

 

   13.            ii. ELEAZER HAYWARD was born on 11 Nov 1709 in Mendon, MA. He died on 14 Jan 1782 in Bellingham, MA. He married Mary A. Daniels, daughter of Christopher Daniels on 15 Feb 1733 in Bellingham, MA. She died on 15 Mar 1814 in Bellingham, MA.

 

   14.            iii.    EBENEZER HAYWARD SR was born on 19 Nov 1714 in Mendon, MA. He married

 

HANNAH UNKNOWN.

 

iv.      WILLIAM HAYWARD was born on 03 Jan 1718.

 

v.       JACOB HAYWARD was born on 27 Apr 1728 in Bellingham, MA.

 

Generation 4

 

9.      JONATHAN4 HAYWARD (Jonathan3, Jonathan2, William1) was born on 29 Dec 1694 in Braintree, MA. He married Mary Savel on 14 Jan 1720 in Braintree, MA. She was born on 22 Aug 1694.

 

Jonathan Hayward and Mary Savel had the following children:

 

i.        JONATHAN5 HAYWARD was born on 20 May 1721 in Braintree, MA.

 

ii.       SUSANNA HAYWARD was born on 21 Feb 1723 in Braintree, MA. She married Samuel Wild on 30 Apr 1741.

 

10.      SARAH4 HAYWARD (Jonathan3, Jonathan2, William1) was born on 19 Oct 1705 in Braintree, Norfolk Co, Ma. She died after 26 Sep 1782. She married (1) THOMAS (DEACON) WALES, son of Nathaniel Wales and Joanna Faxon on 07 Sep 1742 in Braintree, Norfolk Co, Ma. He was born on 19 Apr 1695 in Braintree, Norfolk Co, MA. He died in 1775 in Braintree, Norfolk Co, MA. She married (2) SAMUEL (SGT) BELCHER on 13 Jan 1725/26 in Braintree, Norfolk Co, Ma. He was born on 19 Aug 1699 in Braintree, Norfolk Co, Ma. He died on 21 Jun 1738 in Quincy, Norfolk, MA (Belcher Tomb, Hancock Cem, Quincy, MA).

 

Notes for Samuel (Sgt) Belcher:

 

buried in Belcher Tomb, Hancock Cem., Quincy.

He was elected fenceviewer 1728, surveyor of clapboards & shingles 1729,1730-1, constable 1733.

Resided on present Franklin St., Quincy, west side, just south of Independence Ave. His children sold the homestead, house, barn & 10 or 12 acres to Joseph Field Feb.9,1739 (S.D. 97-86)

 

S.P.34-44: Sarah Belcher widow made administrator of husband Samuel, husbandman Aug.6,1738.

 

34-446, Inventory, Sep.27,1738: presented by Sarah Belcher, admtr.: A negro boy of 3 years of age £30, pew in the meeting house £15. half tomb in the burying place £7/10/.

 

The homestead 11 acres with all the buildings £450. 17a. pasture land £150.

 

4a. upland & 4a. salt joining together £160.

3a. salt at Broad Meadows £90.

2 1/2a. at Salter's farm £75.

19a. woodland in ye upper precinct £66/10/. A piece of cedar swamp in Bare Swamp £10.

A share of cedar swamp in Middle Swamp £10. 12a. woodland £45.

 

1 share woodland £18.

Taken by John Adams, Moses Belcher, John Ruggles Sep.12,1738.

 

Acct. 447 pd. John Webster for mourning Sep.7,1739 pd. Dr. Bulfinch for med. & attendance.

 

pd. Dr. Delhonde for ditto.

pd. John Haines for opening of ye tomb. buried in Belcher Tomb, Hancock Cem., Quincy.

He was elected fenceviewer 1728, surveyor of clapboards & shingles 1729,1730-1, constable 1733.

 

Resided on present Franklin St., Quincy, west side, just south of Independence Ave. His children sold the homestead, house, barn & 10 or 12 acres to Joseph Field Feb.9,1739 (S.D. 97-86)

 

S.P.34-44: Sarah Belcher widow made administrator of husband Samuel, husbandman Aug.6,1738.

 

34-446, Inventory, Sep.27,1738: presented by Sarah Belcher, admtr.: A negro boy of 3 years of age £30, pew in the meeting house £15. half tomb in the burying place £7/10/.

 

The homestead 11 acres with all the buildings £450. 17a. pasture land £150.

 

4a. upland & 4a. salt joining together £160.

3a. salt at Broad Meadows £90.

2 1/2a. at Salter's farm £75.

19a. woodland in ye upper precinct £66/10/. A piece of cedar swamp in Bare Swamp £10.

A share of cedar swamp in Middle Swamp £10. 12a. woodland £45.

 

1 share woodland £18.

 

Taken by John Adams, Moses Belcher, John Ruggles Sep.12,1738.

 

Acct. 447 pd. John Webster for mourning Sep.7,1739 pd. Dr. Bulfinch for med. & attendance.

 

pd. Dr. Delhonde for ditto.

pd. John Haines for opening of ye tomb.

 

Samuel (Sgt) Belcher and Sarah Hayward had the following children:

 

i.        SAMUEL5 BELCHER was born on 07 Nov 1726 in Braintree, Norfolk Co, Ma. He died on 25 Jan 1726/27 in Braintree, Norfolk Co, Ma.

 

   14.            ii. SARAH BELCHER was born on 12 Dec 1729 in Braintree, Norfolk Co, MA. She died on 22 Feb 1816 in Randolph, Norfolk, Ma. She married Atherton Wales, son of Thomas (deacon) Wales and Mary Belcher on 04 Dec 1744 in Braintree, Norfolk Co, Ma. He was born on 11 Feb 1721 in Braintree, Norfolk Co, MA. He died on 31 May 1801.

 

iii.      ELIZABETH BELCHER was born on 22 Nov 1733 in Braintree, Norfolk Co, Ma. She married an unknown spouse about 1753 in Braintree, Norfolk Co, Ma.

 

   15.            iv. SUSANNA BELCHER was born on 19 Apr 1736 in Braintree, Norfolk Co, Ma. She died on 07 Nov 1777 in Holbrook, Randolph Co, MA (Union Cemetery, Holbrook, Randolph, MA). She married Jonathan Bass on 24 Jan 1756 in Braintree, Norfolk Co, Ma. He was born on 14 Nov 1733. He died on 12 May 1790 in Randolph Co, MA (Union Cemetery, Holbrook, Randolph, MA).

 

   16.            v. SAMUEL BELCHER was born on 21 Nov 1738 in Braintree, Norfolk Co, Ma. He died on 06 Jun 1795 in Randolph, Norfolk, Ma. He married an unknown spouse on 03 Jul 1758 in Braintree, Norfolk Co, Ma. He married (2) SARAH WALES on 03 Jul 1758 in Braintree, Norfolk Co, Ma. She was born on 07 Sep 1731 in Braintree, Norfolk Co, Ma. She died on 06 Jun 1807 in Randolph, Norfolk, Ma.

 

11.      WILLIAM4 HAYWARD (William3, Samuel2, William1) was born on 25 Mar 1694 in Mendon, MA. He died on 06 Feb 1790 in Sturbridge, MA. He married Elizabeth Gibbs on 16 May 1717 in Framingham, MA. She died on 13 Feb 1776 in Upton, MA.

 

William Hayward and Elizabeth Gibbs had the following children:

 

i.        WILLIAM5 HAYWARD was born on 15 Feb 1718 in Mendon, MA.

 

ii.       BEULAH HAYWARD was born on 26 Aug 1719 in Mendon, MA.

 

iii.      HEPZIBAH HAYWARD was born on 26 Aug 1719 in Mendon, MA.

 

iv.      JOSEPH HAYWARD was born on 27 Mar 1721 in Mendon, MA.

 

v.       ELIZABETH HAYWARD was born on 28 Dec 1726 in Mendon, MA.

 

vi.      JOSIAH HAYWARD was born on 23 Jul 1729 in Mendon, MA. He died on 24 Feb 1808 in Mendon, MA.

 

vii.     ELIJAH HAYWARD was born on 03 Nov 1732 in Mendon, MA.

 

12.      ELEAZER4 HAYWARD (William3, William2, William1) was born on 11 Nov 1709 in Mendon, MA. He died on 14 Jan 1782 in Bellingham, MA. He married Mary A. Daniels, daughter of Christopher Daniels on 15 Feb 1733 in Bellingham, MA. She died on 15 Mar 1814 in Bellingham, MA.

 

Eleazer Hayward and Mary A. Daniels had the following children:

 

i.        WILLIAM5 HAYWARD was born on 10 Aug 1738 in Mendon, MA. He died on 09 May 1753.

 

ii.       MARAY/MARY HAYWARD was born on 09 Aug 1740 in Bellingham, MA.

 

iii.      SARAH HAYWARD was born on 25 Mar 1743 in Bellingham, MA.

 

iv.      BETHIAH HAYWARD was born on 28 Jan 1745 in Bellingham, MA. She married Ezar Forristall on 16 Aug 1764 in Mendon, MA.

 

   17.            v. JEMINA HAYWARD was born on 13 Aug 1747 in Bellingham, Norfolk Co., MA. She died on 21 Mar 1838 in Milford, Worcester Co., MA. She married Ephraim Parkhurst, son of Jonas Parkhurst and Abigail Bigelow on 30 Sep 1767 in Bellingham, Norfolk Co., MA. He was born on 27 Dec 1743 in Mendon, Worcester Co., MA. He died on 20 Sep 1838 in Milford, Worcester Co., MA.

 

vi.      ELEAZER HAYWARD was born on 29 Sep 1750 in Bellingham, MA.

 

vii.     ANNE HAYWARD was born on 25 Apr 1753 in Bellingham, MA.

 

13.      EBENEZER4 HAYWARD SR (William3, William2, William1) was born on 19 Nov 1714 in Mendon, MA. He married HANNAH UNKNOWN.

 

Ebenezer Hayward Sr and Hannah Unknown had the following children:

 

   18.            i.     EBENEZER5 HAYWARD JR was born on 24 May 1736. He married HANNAH UNKNOWN.

 

ii.       ASA HAYWARD was born on 19 Sep 1739 in Bellingham, MA.

 

iii.      ELISABETH HAYWARD was born on 03 Feb 1740.

 

iv.      ELISHIRE HAYWARD was born on 15 May 1743.

 

v.       HANNAH HAYWARD was born on 12 Sep 1746.

 

vi.      HENERY HAYWARD was born on 03 Aug 1749.

 

vii.     RACHEL HAYWARD was born on 21 Jul 1751.

 

viii.    SETH HAYWARD was born on 09 Oct 1752.

 

Generation 5

 

14.      SARAH5 BELCHER (Sarah4 Hayward, Jonathan3 Hayward, Jonathan2 Hayward, William1 Hayward) was born on 12 Dec 1729 in Braintree, Norfolk Co, MA. She died on 22 Feb 1816 in Randolph, Norfolk, Ma. She married Atherton Wales, son of Thomas (deacon) Wales and Mary Belcher on 04 Dec 1744 in Braintree, Norfolk Co, Ma. He was born on 11 Feb 1721 in Braintree, Norfolk Co, MA. He died on 31 May 1801.

 

Atherton Wales and Sarah Belcher had the following children:

 

i.        JONATHAN6 WALES was born on 20 Mar 1745 in Braintree, Norfolk Co, MA. He married Abigail Penniman on 17 May 1766 in Braintree, Norfolk Co, MA. She was born on 15 Aug 1745. She died on 25 Jun 1833.

 

ii.       ATHERTON WALES was born on 07 Oct 1761 in Braintree, Norfolk Co, MA.

15.      SUSANNA5 BELCHER (Sarah4 Hayward, Jonathan3 Hayward, Jonathan2 Hayward, William1 Hayward) was born on 19 Apr 1736 in Braintree, Norfolk Co, Ma. She died on 07 Nov 1777 in Holbrook, Randolph Co, MA (Union Cemetery, Holbrook, Randolph, MA). She married Jonathan Bass on 24 Jan 1756 in Braintree, Norfolk Co, Ma. He was born on 14 Nov 1733. He died on 12 May 1790 in Randolph Co, MA (Union Cemetery, Holbrook, Randolph, MA).

 

Jonathan Bass and Susanna Belcher had the following children:

 

i.        SAMUEL6 BASS was born on 15 May 1757. He married Sarah Lawrence on 30 Oct 1783. She was born on 12 May 1760.

 

ii.       SARAH BASS was born on 24 Jan 1760. She married Ebenezer Alden in Apr 1787. He was born on 04 Jul 1755 in Stafford, Tolland Co, CT.

 

16.      SAMUEL5 BELCHER (Sarah4 Hayward, Jonathan3 Hayward, Jonathan2 Hayward, William1 Hayward) was born on 21 Nov 1738 in Braintree, Norfolk Co, Ma. He died on 06 Jun 1795 in Randolph, Norfolk, Ma. He married an unknown spouse on 03 Jul 1758 in Braintree, Norfolk Co, Ma. He married (2) SARAH WALES on 03 Jul 1758 in Braintree, Norfolk Co, Ma. She was born on 07 Sep 1731 in Braintree, Norfolk Co, Ma. She died on 06 Jun 1807 in Randolph, Norfolk, Ma.

 

Notes for Samuel Belcher: (posthumous).

 

He was elected surveyor of highways 1776, the only town office he held.

In May 1762 he bought a house 54 acres of Jonathan Wales on present No. Main St. Randolph which became his homestead and that of his descendants for many years. The old "Samuel Belcher" house stood till after 1900 on the E. side of No. Main St. nearly opposite the present Jonathan Belcher or Ladies Library Ass'n. house, north of West St.

 

Samuel Belcher and Sarah Wales had the following children:

 

i.        JOSEPH6 BELCHER was born about 1772 in Braintree, Norfolk Co, Ma (Baptized 05 Jul 1772 Braintree, Norfolk, Ma). He died in 1841 in Port Byron, Rock Island Co, IL (Buried probably Old Port Byron Cemetery). He married Thankful Baker, daughter of Jacob Baker and Rachel Wheldon on 26 May 1792 in Braintree, Norfolk Co, Ma. She was born in 1772. She died after 1840 in Port Byron, Rock Island Co, IL (Buried probably Old Port Byron Cemetery).

 

Notes for Joseph Belcher: Removed to Oxford, Cheshire, Nh

 

ii.       SARAH BELCHER was born before 12 Feb 1764 in Braintree, Norfolk Co, Ma.

 

Notes for Sarah Belcher: died young

 

iii.      SARAH BELCHER was born before 02 Jul 1775 in Randolph, Norfolk, Ma. She married Adam Hobart Jr. on 09 Mar 1799 in Braintree, Norfolk Co, Ma. He was born on 18 Mar 1776 in Braintree, Norfolk Co, Ma. He died on 13 Apr 1849.

 

iv.      EPHRAIM BELCHER was born before 18 Mar 1770 in Braintree, Norfolk Co, Ma. He died on 01 Jan 1846 in Randolph, Norfolk, Ma. He married MARY STETSON. She was born on 14 Sep 1770 in Braintree, Norfolk Co, Ma. She died on 17 Feb 1857 in Randolph, Norfolk, Ma.

 

Notes for Ephraim Belcher:

 

Bapt. 18 Mar, 1770, died 1 Jan 1846, age 75yrs 10mo. (gs).

They lived on Chestnut St., Randolph where he bought land in 1794 and built soon after, was a carpenter.

 

v.       JONATHAN BELCHER was born on 26 Mar 1767 in Braintree, Norfolk Co, Ma. He died on 10 Oct 1838 in Randolph, Norfolk, Ma. He married Abigail Thayer on 12 Apr 1792 in Randolph, Norfolk, Ma. She was born about 1772 in Braintree, Norfolk Co, Ma. She died on 29 Aug 1857 in Randolph, Norfolk, Ma.

 

Notes for Jonathan Belcher: Bapt. 29 Mar. 1767

 

He built in 1806 the beautiful house on No. Main St. Randolph, at N. corner of West (Warren?) St., now owned by the Ladies Library Association, was a master carpenter distinguished for mechanical skill ingenuity.

 

vi.      PHEBE BELCHER was born on 28 Oct 1758 in Braintree, Norfolk Co, Ma. She died on 14 Aug 1825 in Randolph, Norfolk, Ma. She married David Whitcomb on 20 Sep 1779 in Braintree, Norfolk Co, Ma. He was born on 14 Dec 1751 in Braintree, Norfolk Co, Ma. He died on 06 Jul 1794 in Randolph, Norfolk, Ma.

 

vii.     SAMUEL BELCHER JR. was born on 03 Aug 1761 in Braintree, Norfolk Co, Ma. He died on 11 May 1840 in Randolph, Norfolk, Ma. He married Mary Thayer on 10 Sep 1784 in Braintree, Norfolk Co, Ma. She was born on 07 Oct 1755 in Braintree, Norfolk Co, Ma. She died on 01 Nov 1839 in Randolph, Norfolk, Ma.

 

Notes for Samuel Belcher Jr.:

 

Children of Samuel & Mary born at Randolph (dates from Thayer Memorial).

 

17.      JEMINA5 HAYWARD (Eleazer4, William3, William2, William1) was born on 13 Aug 1747 in Bellingham, Norfolk Co., MA. She died on 21 Mar 1838 in Milford, Worcester Co., MA. She married Ephraim Parkhurst, son of Jonas Parkhurst and Abigail Bigelow on 30 Sep 1767 in Bellingham, Norfolk Co., MA. He was born on 27 Dec 1743 in Mendon, Worcester Co., MA. He died on 20 Sep 1838 in Milford, Worcester Co., MA.

 

Notes for Ephraim Parkhurst:

 

Ephraim served as a Corporal in the Minutemen from from Milford, MA during the American Revolution. His homestead extended to the northern portion of his father's estate, with perhaps some additional land.

 

Ephraim Parkhurst and Jemina Hayward had the following children:

 

i.        EBENEZER6 PARKHURST was born on 09 Mar 1768 in Milford, Worcester Co., MA. He died on 27 May 1791 in Milford, Worcester Co., MA.

 

Notes for Ebenezer Parkhurst:

 

Eleazer was "killed by a falling stone in his 24th year". It is unknown from where the stone was falling.

 

ii.       NATHAN PARKHURST was born on 22 Jan 1770 in Milford, Worcester Co., MA. He died on 13 Dec 1820 in Milford, Worcester Co., MA. He married Ruth Rawson, daughter of Nathaniel Rawson and Elizabeth Nelson in 1797 in Milford, Worcester Co., MA. She was born on 25 Oct 1770 in Mendon, Worcester Co., MA. She died on 01 Apr 1851 in Milford, Worcester Co., MA.

 

Notes for Nathan Parkhurst:

 

Parkhurst brothers, Nathan and Ithiel, married Rawson sisters, Ruth and Catherine. For many years, Nathan was a clothier and miller at Milford, MA. His mill site was on an island just below the Charles River Bridge.

 

Nathan died of fever.

 

iii.      ITHNIEL PARKHURST was born on 27 Mar 1772 in Milford, Worcester Co., MA. He died on 02 Aug 1855 in Milford, Worcester Co., MA. He married (1) CATHERINE RAWSON, daughter of Nathaniel Rawson and Elizabeth Nelson on 06 Mar 1794 in Milford, Worcester Co., MA. She was born on 07 Jan 1773 in Mendon, Worcester Co., MA. She died on 10 Oct 1848 in Milford, Worcester Co., MA. He married (2) CLARISSA (WIDOW CHILDS) FALES, daughter of John Fales and Mary Unknown on 12 Apr 1849 in Milford, Worcester Co., MA.

 

iv.      ESTHER PARKHURST was born on 05 Feb 1774 in Milford, Worcester Co., MA. She died on 09 Aug 1851 in Clinton, Oneida Co., NY. She married Simeon Nelson, son of Seth Nelson and Silence Cheney on 30 Oct 1794 in Milford, Worcester Co., MA. He was born in 1772 in Milford, Worcester Co., MA. He died in Clinton, Oneida Co., NY.

 

v.       STERLING PARKHURST was born on 03 Feb 1777 in Milford, Worcester Co., MA. He died on 23 Aug 1855 in LeClaire, Scott Co., Iowa. He married Anna Spears, daughter of Allen Spear and Elizabeth Scott on 08 Mar 1800 in Ontario Co., New York. She was born on 31 Mar 1781 in Stoddard, Cheshire Co., NH. She died on 05 Sep 1844 in Waupscpinacon, Scott Co, Iowa.

 

Notes for Sterling Parkhurst:

 

Sterling was induced by his youngest brother, Eleazer, to come to the new settlement of "Parkhurst" Town in Iowa from his home is New York State. He came on ahead of his family during the summer of 1836, arranging for his wife, sons Lemuel and Whitney, and two daughters, Mary and Jemina, to come by covered wagon that fall. The family left Ontario Co., New York on September 10, driving a team and wagon, with fourteen year old Lemuel in charge. They crossed the Niagara River at Lewiston, traveled through Canada by way of Windsor, and reentered the United States at Detroit.

 

On the trip from Detroit, the family encountered bad roads, or no roads, all the way West. Near Chicago the road was barely a track through swampland. They crossed the Rock River by ferry and arrived at Port Byron, Illinois on October 6, completing a journey of twenty six days. At Port Byron there was not yet a ferry, but someone was just finishing making a flat boat. The family helped to caulk and tar the flatboat, and they were the first settlers to cross the river on it. When they landed at the cabin on the river bank, they found 500 Indians camping at the area. The Indians had come by permission from their reservation on the Iowa River to do some hunting for the winter.

 

Princeton Twp:

 

Between the years 1836 and 1840 came Daniel Hire, Benjamin F. Pike, Jesse R. James, Samuel Sturtivant, John B. Doty, Benjamin Doolittle, Jonas Barber, Jacob Rose, Abijah Goodrich, Mr. Sweet, Avery D. Pinneo, Gideon Averill, William Palmer, Franklin Rowe, Sterling Parkhurst, Matthias L. Pinneo, Samuel Gast, George Gast, Susanna Gast, Issac Daughenbaugh, John Leamer, Polly Leamer, Samuel S. Gast, John A. Gast, Wm. Gast, Henry Shadle, Mary A. Shadle, Jacob Fulmer and Christina Fulmer.

HISTORY OF PRINCETON TOWNSHIP

 

"From History of Scott County, Iowa 1882 Chicago: Interstate Publishing Co."

 

Surnames: Averill, Armstrong, Andrews, Barber, Budd, Boyd, Bell, Breckenridge, Bennett, Brusch, Conrad, Culbertson, Calhoun, Conrod, Coates, Chapman, Chamberlin, Doty, Doolittle, Daughenbaugh, Dunlap, Durbin, Dubois, Earhart, Fulmer, Fishback, Forsyth, Ferguson, Goodrich, Gast, Garber, Galt, Garner, Gaw, Harlaw, Haswell, Hubbard, Hammond, Hogan, Hire, Heleman, Huey, Herbert, Hays, Hopson, James, Kierney, Knox, Leamer, Lancaster, Maxwell, McKinster, McCoy, McKinstry, Metzgar, Morgan, McQuiston, Mathews, Moss, Martin, Monk, Pinneo, Pike, Palmer, Parkhurst, Peaslee, Patterson, Porter, Parcell, Penry, Rose, Rowe, Rice, Rathman, Stichter, Sturtivant, Sweet, Shadle, Sheer, Shafter, Slaughter, Stewart, Stafford, Shoemaker, Scott, Shaw, Sherman, Shearer, Suiter, Todd, Thompson, Taylor, Ulam, Vanduzer, Warren, Walker, Walter, Welch, Williams and Waters.

 

Princeton is the most northern township of Scott County, lying along the river, the first permanent settlement of which was made in the spring of 1836.

 

Giles M. Pinneo and Haswell H. Pinneo located their claims in the fall of 1835, and moved on them as permanent settlers in the spring of 1836. George W. Harlan had located some claims prior to this for speculative purposes, but with no thought of settlement. Giles M. Pinneo settled where he now resides, on section 84, while Haswell made his claim upon which a portion of the village of Princeton was subsequently located. Many of the early settlers will remember his neat hewed log cabin, and the welcome there extended to all who might choose to call and test the hospitality of its owner. He died many years since, enjoying the respect of all who knew him.

 

Thomas Hubbard, Sr., who had been living on the opposite side of the river since the close of the Black Hawk war, in the spring of 1836 moved over and settled on what is now a part of the city of Princeton. The Pinneos and Mr. Hubbard were the only settlers during the year 1836.

 

Thomas Hubbard was from Kentucky; had served in the Black Hawk war, and seemed to have much of the old Kentucky hatred for Indians. While settled upon the Illinois side of the river, he had frequent raids made upon him by the red skins, which were repelled in true pioneer spirit. The Indians were in the habit of stealing from him such few articles of "animal civilization" as he was able to gather around him, such as fowls, hogs and cattle. He had procured some bees from the forest, which at that time were plenty, when one day on his return to his cabin he found that they had been robbed by the Indians. He was soon upon their trail with his rifle, and came up with them as they were leaving the shore in their canoes. He fired upon them, when the fire was returned, Hubbard taking to a tree for shelter. Several shots were passed and one Indian was killed. Many other skirmishes were often related by the old man of the his exploits with the red skins. He returned to Kentucky and there died many years ago.

 

Between the years 1836 and 1840 came Daniel Hire, Benjamin F. Pike, Jesse R. James, Samuel Sturtivant, John B. Doty, Benjamin Doolittle, Jonas Barber, Jacob Rose, Abijah Goodrich, Mr. Sweet, Avery D. Pinneo, Gideon Averill, William Palmer, Franklin Rowe, Sterling Parkhurst, Matthias L. Pinneo, Samuel Gast, George Gast, Susanna Gast, Issac Daughenbaugh, John Leamer, Polly Leamer, Samuel S. Gast, John A. Gast, Wm. Gast, Henry Shadle, Mary A. Shadle, Jacob Fulmer and Christina Fulmer.

 

From 1840 settlement was slow in the township for 10 years, when for a time settlers came in quite rapidly. The township now has 300 voters.

 

In the first settlement of Princeton Township, like all other pioneer places, families underwent many privations. Supplies of every kind, except for wild meat, had to be obtained from Fort Armstrong, on Rock Island. These were taken up by water over the rapids in Indian canoes. It was but little they were able to purchase, and all that was expected in those days were the bare necessaries of life. A story is told of one of the Pinneos making a journey to Davenport, after it became settled and a store had been established, with a lot of beans in order to exchange them for goods to make clothing for his family. It was bitter cold weather, and on the way he had an attack of the ague. He exchanged his beans with much difficulty at 25 cents per bushel, heaping measure, and took their "five-cent" calico at the rate of 35 cents per yard. These were the beginnings of some of those who settled in this township. But the brighter days have dawned, and many of the old settlers now enjoy the fruits of early toil, and are no more placed under the necessity of "planning and contriving" to secure the little necessary to eke out an existence.

 

Benjamin F. Pike came up from Rockingham in the spring of 1838, and brought with him a small stock of goods, which was the first store of any kind in the township.

 

The first frame house built in the township was in 1837, by Daniel Hire. In the spring of 1838 Benjamin Doolittle established the first public ferry across the Wapsipinecon River, on the road from Davenport to Comanche. Jonas Barber built a steam mill this year, the first of any kind in the township. A distillery was also built this year by Jacob Rose. The first children born were Henry Hire, Thomas Doty, and Albert Pinneo. The first deaths in the township were Mrs. Mary Sweet and Mrs. Lucy Goodrich.

 

The Methodist circuit rider at an early day penetrated the township and was followed from time to time by representatives of various denominations. There are now three represented in the township by organizations-Methodist Episcopal, Presbyterian, and Lutheran. The later organization is at Lost Grove. In 1853 three members of the Methodist Episcopal church,-Porter McKinster, Jerry Goodrich and James Todd-assisted by their friends and neighbors, erected a brick church edifice, 26x36 feet. After holding services in this church about three years, the organization was transferred to Princeton, its three principal members having died meanwhile. On the 10th of February, 1856, Rev. Daniel Garber, a minister of the Evangelical Lutheran church at Davenport, came to the township and organized a congregation of that faith.

 

On Saturday, May8, a meeting was held for the election of officers. Isaac Daughenbaugh was elected elder, and Samuel Gast, deacon. The first meetings were held at the brick church, erected by the Methodists, and which they continued to use as the property of that denomination until 1859, when they built a house of worship in the town of Princeton, at a cost of $565, which they exchanged with the Methodists for their church edifice at Lost Grove, where they yet worship.

 

Rev. Daniel Garber was the first pastor. He supplied the church until March 10,1857, when Rev. F.R. Sheer was called and served until 1869, with success, with the exception of one year (1858). In 1869 Rev. George W. Shaffer supplied the pulpit, during which time he had a revival and 14 additions to the church. Mr. Shaffer continued with the church until November, 1878, when Rev. J.L. Hammond assumed the pastorate. Regular services of the church are held every Sabbath. The present membership is 52. The present officers are as follows: Samuel Heleman and J.A. Gast, elders; Adam McCoy and John Shaffer, deacons.

 

The Sabbath-school was first organized by the Methodist Episcopal brethren in 1853. The first superintendent was Daniel Conrad, a local M.E. preacher from

LeClaire; secretary and librarian, James Todd. In 1856 the Lutheran congregation took charge of the school, electing Dr. Samuel Gast, of Princeton, as superintendent; J.L. Gast, secretary and librarian. The present superintendent is Rev. E. Hammon, assistant superintendent, W.E. Gast, secretary, William Hammond, librarian, G.C. Gast. There are now 80 pupils enrolled, with the average attendance of 60.

 

PUBLIC SCHOOLS.

 

The men who first settled this township being young men without families, it was for some time unnecessary to have schools, but as soon as children were reared large enough to attend, the parents provided schools as good as their limited means, both of money and ability in teachers, could afford. The first school that was kept in what is now known as Princeton Independent District, was taught in the year 1846 or '47, by Miss Hanah Peaslee, in a log house owned by H.H. Pinneo. The succeeding teachers in the same house were Mrs. Charles Budd and Milcah Goodrich. About 1850, a bitter dispute having arisen as to where a proposed school-house should be located, the quarrel was carried so far that the project for building at all had for a time to be abandoned. In the meantime G.H. Pinneo and Wilbur Warren being determined to have a school for their children, joined together and bought an old barn, added some lumber to it, and with their own hands constructed a house that was used for some time for both school and church purposes. In 1852 a house 25x35 now known as the old school-house was built in the town, costing $375, and was then thought to be quite extravagant. The first teacher in this house was Mathias D. Pinneo. In 1856 it was found that the title to the land on which this house was built was not good. So the heirs of the land made a compromise with the district by buying lot No.2, block 18, and building another house exactly like the old one on this lot. This house was used for school purposes till 1864, when this school and the other schools in town were consolidated and occupied the upper and lower stories of a hall on Front street. In 1862, under an act that had been recently passed, what had formerly been known as District No.1, Princeton Township, was erected into an independent district. The first president of the independent district was Samuel Scott; first secretary, A.H. Pinneo; and treasurer, D.H. Culbertson. Mr. Culbertson has been treasurer ever since. In 1866 it was determined to build a house suitable for school purposes, and the contract was awarded to the firm of Walker & Patterson, for $4,500. C.W. Pinneo was the first principal in this house, and has been ever since, except two years G.M. Boyd and two years J.S. Huey taught. The present teachers are C.W. Pinneo, principal; W.L. Calhoun, intermediate, and D.E. James, primary. Miss Peaslee, the first teacher in this district, received for salary $1.75 per week and boarded around. The present female teacher receives $9 per week. $20 per month was the highest wages paid to a male teacher previous to the year 1858, when the law requiring teachers to stand an examination before a county superintendent went into force. The wages very soon advanced when some qualifications were required, and greatly added to the efficiency of the schools. The number at present is about 150 scholars in all the departments, and the schools are considered quite satisfactory in their management.

 

Princeton Township has six sub-districts, an enrollment of 142, and 219 of school age. It has six school-houses, valued at $5,500. The town of Princeton is an independent district, with a stone school-house valued at $5,000. There are 189 pupils in the district with an enrollment of 98. Three teachers are employed, and the school is a graded one.

 

TOWN OF PRINCETON

 

The first recorded plan of Princeton bears date Dec. 22, 1853. Robert Bell, George H. Bell and John Culbertson were the proprietors. The beginning of a town had been made prior to this.

 

In the spring of 1838 B.F. Pike opened a store in the neighborhood, the first in the township. The next one was opened by a company known as "Lawyer Hammond & Co. In 1848 W.F. Breckenridge opened a store here, calling the place at that time "Pinnacle Point."

 

The city of Princeton was incorporated January, 1857, and in the month of March following the first charter election was held. Samuel Porter was elected the first mayor and resigned in May. At a special election held soon after, William Shaw was elected mayor to fill the vacancy. At this time the city contained about 250 inhabitants, one store kept by Walter & Armstrong, two public houses, one smith shop, one steam saw-mill, one church and forty-six dwelling houses.

 

In the month of March, 1858, William H. Thompson was elected mayor. This year the population of the place had increased to 500. The improvements were greater in the youthful city of Princeton than at any other point on the Mississippi River, for the number of inhabitants. This year there was built one steam saw-mill, by Isaac Sherman, from Cleveland, Ohio, at a cost of $8,000, capable of cutting 30,000 feet per day; two steam grist-mills, one by McKinstry & Hubbard, at a cost of $12,000; one by Herbert & Fishback, at a cost of $9,000, thought the firm failed before completing it. D.D. McCoy built a large house and opened a fancy dry-goods store. This season there were 62 dwellings built, among which was one by Dr. G.L. Bell, which cost about $5,000.

 

In March, 1859, Dr. Thomas Galt was elected mayor. This year the population had reached 1,000, but, owing to the hard times there was not so much improvement as the previous year. Walker & Patterson built a steam planing-mill, with all the improved machinery for making sash, doors and blinds, which was a great benefit to the place and surrounding country, besides being remunerative to its enterprising projectors. F.G. Welch built a large three-story building for a dry-goods store, but did not live to enjoy his enterprising undertaking. R. Bennett also erected a large store and opened a good stock of dry goods and groceries, and with the assistance of A. Kierney started a tin shop. This year the Presbyterians erected their church edifice. Dr. Galt erected a fine brick residence, 36x40, two stories and a half high, and finished in the latest style. At this time there were 15 carpenters, six blacksmiths, four shoemakers, two tailors, one tinker, seven stores, one drug store, two churches, two public houses, one livery stable, two steam saw-mills, two steam grist-mills, one steam planing-mill, two carriage shops, four blacksmith shops, two public schools, two private schools, one lawyer.*

 

vi.      SARAH PARKHURST was born on 12 Apr 1779 in Milford, Worcester Co., MA. She died in Ohio. She married Obed Daniels on 06 Apr 1800 in Milford, Worcester Co., MA. He was born on 27 Dec 1768 in Holliston, Middlesex Co., MA. He died in Ohio.

 

vii.     LUCY PARKHURST was born on 19 Jun 1782 in Milford, Worcester Co., MA. She died on 22 Sep 1798 in Milford, Worcester Co., MA.

 

viii.    (MARY) ANNE PARKHURST was born on 29 Aug 1784 in Milford, Worcester Co., MA. She married Preston Thayer on 21 Feb 1808 in Milford, Worcester Co., MA.

 

ix.      EPHRAIM PARKHURST was born on 19 Mar 1787 in Milford, Worcester Co., MA. He died on 06 Oct 1837 in Milford, Worcester Co., MA. He married (1) LUCINDA PERRY, daughter of Adams Perry and Anna Wait on 26 Apr 1812 in Holliston, Middlesex Co., MA. She was born on 21 Jan 1791 in Holliston, Middlesex Co., MA. She died on 30 Dec 1821 in Milford, Worcester Co., MA. He married (2) ELIZA BROAD, daughter of Joseph Broad and Sibel Unknown on 13 Jan 1823 in Barre, Worcester Co., MA.

 

x.       HARRIOT PARKHURST was born on 19 Oct 1791 in Milford, Worcester Co., MA. She died on 19 May 1856 in Milford, Worcester Co., MA.

 

xi.      ELEAZER PARKHURST was born on 18 Apr 1793 in Milford, Worcester Co., MA. He died on 21 Oct 1851 in Parkhurst, Scott Co., Iowa. He married (1) LINDA CHAPIN, daughter of Marvel Church Chapin and Mary Nelson on 03 Dec 1818 in Milford, Worcester Co., MA. She was born on 18 Feb 1798 in Milford, Worcester Co., MA. She died on 12 Sep 1849 in Parkhurst, Scott Co., Iowa. He married (2) ESTER B. ZEBLY about 1850 in Parkhurst, Scott Co., Iowa. She was born about 1807 in VT.

 

Notes for Eleazer Parkhurst:

 

Eleazer left Milford, MA about 1828. He moved to a farm in the Meredosia bottom lands between the Rock River and the Mississippi River in Illinois. He lived there until 1834 when he crossed the Mississippi and bought a claim, with a cabin, located on the riverbank. George Harlen, a veteran of the Blackhawk War, had built the cabin in February 1834.

 

Eleazer extended his claim west and north along the river. He opened up the first farm in what is now LeClaire Township. In 1842 he built a stone and frame house on the farm. The house is still occupied and in good condition (1993). This is the Emil Dreschler farm next to Cody School. Eleazer built another home for himself across the street from the riverbank cabin. This house is still in good condition and is occupied (1993). This is the Carl Alverd home. Eleazer decided that his area had good possibilities for a town. He applied to the U.S. Government for a post office. In 1836 the request was granted, and the post office was named "Parkhurst".

 

Eleazer sold part of his land claim to Thomas Eads, the father of the noted engineer James B. Eads. The Parkhursts and Thomas Eads laid out the town of "Parkhurst" in 1837. Area maps showed the town of Parkhurst as late as 1900. For a while the town was known as Berlin. The town eventually became part of the town of LeClaire.

.

EARLY SETTLERS.

 

Martin W. Smith was the second settler in LeClaire Township, and was followed the same season, 1834, by Nathan and Ira F. Smith, who settled just below the present town of Le Claire. Phillip Suiter came in the fall of the same year. Laurel Summers, now, in 1882, one of the oldest settlers living in the township, says that when he came to the township, in 1837, there were living in the neighborhood of the present town of LeClaire, Eleazer Parkhurst, T.C. Eads, Sterling Parkhurst, J.W. Parkhurst, M.W. Smith, Ira F.Smith, Eli Smith, William Conroe, James Haskell, Phillip Suiter, A.W. Finley, Paul Follmer, S.G. Condit, Griswold Vanduzer, J.M. Vanduzer, Rockwell McKinstry, Josiah Scott, Dr. Z. Grant, Jonas Barber, William Rowe, B.F. Pike, Benjamin Barber, H.E.W. East, Wald Parkhurst, Goodrich Hubbard, L. Parkhurst, W.W. Upton, Alfred Prather, and John Lewis.

 

Between 1837 and 1840 there settled in the township, James Jack, James Spear, William Hopson, Robert Carleton, Parce Barber, George Long, Jacob Carber, Stephen Purcell, Samuel Stopher, Aaron Lancaster, Thomas Lancaster, D.V. Dawley, William Allen, Charles Ames, John Allen, Joseph Turner, Nathaniel Wilson, Ralph Letton, William McGinnis, William Wilson, William Gardner, Isaac Cody, John H. Sessions and James Turner.

The first frame building erected was in the winter of 1836-'7, by Col. T.C. Eads, in the village of Parkhurst, now LeClaire. It is yet standing, and was long regarded as one of the land-marks of the place.

VILLAGE OF PARKHURST

 

In the summer of 1837, Eleazer Parkhurst having disposed of a part of his claim to T.C. Eads, they jointly laid out the town of Parkhurst.

 

The first important improvement made in the place was by Col. Eads in the erection of a large frame building in the summer of 1837. This building was one of the wonders of the age; and is yet standing. Ralph Letton, of Cincinnati, in the spring of 1838 purchased a portion of Col. Eads' interest in the town, and a disagreement among the owners retarded the settlement of the place for several years, and no improvement took place until 1841.

 

The first store opened in the place was in 1839, by Lemuel Parkhurst, in a little stone building erected for that purpose.

 

The town grew but slowly and witnessed some trying periods, and in 1848 could boast only of about a dozen dwelling-houses, while the country back of it had been settling up quite rapidly.

 

During the summer of 1836, Eleazer Parkhurst applied to the post office department for a post office at his place. He immediately received a favorable answer, with the appointment of postmaster, and the office was named Parkhurst, after the name of the petitioner.

 

History of Scott Co, 1910

 

LECLAIRE TOWNSHIP.

 

1834.-At the teaty in 1832 with the Sac and Fox Indians at Davenport (see Chapter 1 of this history), they gave to Antoine LeClaire, Esq., a section of land at the head of the rapids (640 acres). They had at the same treaty presented Mrs. LeClaire with a similar amount of land where the city of Davenport now stands. The reason of this gift was none other, we believe, than out of friendship and respect for Mr. and Mrs. LeClaire. He had been with them from boyhood, either in the employ of the Fur Company or of the government as interpreter, and was very popular with them. The American Fur Company at an early day had a trading house on a small island some three miles below LeClaire called Davenport' island, afterward Smith's island and now Fulton's island. The Indians came across from Rock river, Meredosia swamp and from the Wabesipinecon river to this post to trade. The Indians ever loved to live along the thick timber lands of the "Pau-ke-she-tuck" (rapids) or swift water, where they found abundance of fish. There was much game, also. The forest was dense all through the country lying along the Mississippir river from Spencer's creek at the head of Pleasant valley to Princeton and was of large growth. A corresponding tract, also, of like character lay along the opposite side of the river.

 

The township of LeClaire in its general character is similar to other river townships; perhaps rather more uneven along a portion of its bluffs, but its prairie lands back are among the choicest in Iowa and well settled by enterprising and industrious farmers.

 

The first settlement of LeClaire was not upon that portion given to Mr. LeClaire by the Indians, but was made by Eleazer Parkhurst, Esq., we believe, from the state of Massachusetts. He purchased the claim just above the north line of the reserve, of George W. Harlan who built the cabin thereon. This cabin stood on or near the place of the present residence of Waldo Parkhurst in the present limits of the city of LeClaire and was the first actually settled claim in the township. We believe this cabin was built in February, 1834. His brother, the late Sterling Parkhurst, Esq., was the second settler, but the same season Nathan and Martin W. Smith settled below the town where the old mill now stands. Ira F. Smith came in the autumn of that year and now lives on the old place of Martin W. Smith. All of these early pioneers are now dead except Ira F. Smith.

 

But there seem to have been others even at an earlier day anxious to secure so desirable a site for a town. The importance of the location had attracted the attention of some who at an early day were passing up and down the Mississippi river and were not blind to the coming future. I here insert a document dated the next year after the treaty and after Mr. LeClaire came into possession of the land in which a contract is made for the town site of LeClaire proper:

 

Whereas, it is agreed by and between Antoine LeClaire of the one part and George Davenport, Enoch C. March and John Reynolds of the other part, witnesseth, that the said LeCalire agrees to convey by deed in fee simple to the said Davenport, March and Reynolds, forty acres each, to be taken out of a section of land at the head of the rapids which was granted to said LeClaire by the late treaty with the Sac and Fox Indians. Said land is situated on the Mississippi river on the west side thereof, said LeClaire reserving forty acres himself of said section making in all one-quarter section.

 

Said quarter section is to be located so as to be the suitable for the purpose of laying out a town thereon. And all the parties to this contract agree further to lay out a town on said quarter section of land and to be equal partners and proprietors thereof.

 

Said quarter section of land is to be located and surveyed as soon as practicable and the same surveyed also as soon as practicable into lots.

 

Said Davenport, March and Reynolds in consideration of said land agree to pay him (LeClaire) $80, each one.

 

27th March, 1833                                                                  Test, K. McKenzey.

 

Signed, and sealed:

 

Antoine LeClaire,

 

Geo. Davenport,

 

Enoch C. March,

 

John Reynolds.

 

1835.-At a subsequent date the interest of Enoch C. March, Esq., consisting of one-fourth of the town site was purchased by our fellow townsman, Capt. James May who still retains a large protion of it. Mr. Eleazer Parkhurst opened the first farm upon the prairies back of the town. The town of LeClaire was laid out into lots in the spring or summer of 1837 by the town company, surveyed by Wm. R. Shoemaker, assisted by Henry S. Howell, both United States deputy surveyors. About the same time Mr. Parkhurst having disposed of a part of his claim to Col. T. C. Eads, they jointly laid out the town of Parkhurst.

 

1836.-During the summer of 1836 Mr. Parkhurst applied to the postoffice department for a postoffice at that place. He immediately received a favorable answer, with the appointment of postmaster and the office was named Parkhurst, after the name of the petitioner.

 

During the years 1835 and 1836 emigrants came in and made settlements. Among these was Mr. William Rowe, Josiah Scott, John M. and Griswold VanDuzer, Eli

 

Smith, Dr. Zachariah Grant, William Cousal, Philip Suiter, Noble McKinstry, Rockwell McKinstry, John Lewis and others. A son of M. E. Parkhurst, the Rev. Wm. J. Parkhurst, still resides in this township and is the oldest inhabitant now resident in the place. The two towns, LeClaire and Parkhurst, were for many years rivals in point of progress and exhibited many of those traits so common among the embryo cities of the west. Soon after Parkhurst was laid out, its name was changed with that of its postoffice to Berlin and finally to LeClaire.

 

1837.-Col. T. C. Eads made the first important improvement in Parkhurst in the summer of 1837 by the erection of a large frame dwelling, thirty feet by forty feet, two stories high, and it was one of the wonders of the age. Our fellow citizen, Nathaniel Squires, was the builder and it stands a worthy monument of the genius, enterprise and ambition of those early pioneers.

 

1838.-In the spring of 1838 Ralph Letton, Esq., of Cincinnati purchased a portion of Col. Eads' interest in the town and a disagreement among the owners retarded the settlement and improvement of the place for several years. No decided improvement in either of the towns took place however until 1841. But the progress of settlement by farmers upon the edge of the prairie was considerable, and many farms were opened along the river up to the Wabesipinecon bottoms.

 

1839 and 1840 were, however, dark days in the west, alike to all and every new enterprise or even a new comer was hailed as an acquisition to the infant colony. Lemuel Parkhurst, Esq., now a resident of LeClaire, first opened a store in 1839 in the little stone building in Parkhurst now owned by Mr. W. Gardner. In 1840 the old stone building yet standing on the bank of the river at the foot of Walnut street was erected by Eleazer Parkhurst. The same year he and his nephew Waldo Parkhurst who settled there in 1837 and is still a merchant in LeClaire opened in the stone store a large stock of good of all kinds and continued in the same until 1849 when the firm was dissolved.

 

1841.-In 1841 Charles Ames, William Allen, A. K. Philleo and Martin W. Smith made improvements and settled in the town of LeClaire. Mr. Ames was from Port Byron, on the opposite side of the river and brought with him a stock of goods. He built the house now owned and occupied by his widow, it being the first house built in the city of LeClaire or on the reserve. Here he opened the first stock of goods ever offered for sale in that place. Mr. Ames died in 1846. Mr. Philleo built the house occupied as a bakery now by Mr. Scheck. These were the dark days of LeClaire. Many an old settler will call to mind the few little tenements scattered along the banks of the river through both of the villages and well remember the stately oaks that grew along the streets where now the beautiful mansions and the merchants' blocks rear their massive piles. From this date to 1847 but little progress was made at either town in the way of improvements. Steamboats generally laid up there in low water and windy weather on account of the difficulty of crossing the rapids at such times, and often in extreme low water lighters or flat boats were used to convey freight over as at the present day employing many men. It is the residence of the rapids pilots for boats and rafts. The settlement of the prairie back from the town continued slowly and occasionally a new edifice would appear in LeClaire or Parkhurst.

 

In February, 1837, Messrs. A. H. Davenport and Samuel Lyter of Rockingham opened a store of dry goods and groceries. Mr. Lyter soon gave place in the firm to Robert Christie, Esq., and Winchester Sherman; and in the autumn of 1848 this firm erected the first sawmill in LeClaire, and the following year a flouring mill was added. In the summer of 1851 this mill was burned down and in four months after the firm of Davenport & Rogers who then owned it, erected the Rapids mill upon the same ground.

 

1848.-The comparative size of the two villages at this date may be seen by an article which we quote from the LeClaire Republic of March 23, 1859, from the pen of E. Russell, Esq., then editor of that paper:

 

"In 1848," says Mr. Russell, "when we first visited the locality LeClaire and Parkhurst were separated by a 'gulf' which though easily passed kept each town entirely separate from the other. A beautiful and dense grove of oaks extended from Reynolds street up to Holland street, and no cabins or fences marred the scene. LeClaire then contained nine frame dwelling houses, two brick ditto, one brick store, one frame ditto, occupied, and one or two unoccupied, one brick building used as a pork house, one blacksmith shop, the Baptist church, occupied but not finished, and the old Methodist church in course of erection. Parkhurst boasted of eight frame dwelling houses, one brick ditto, two log ditto, one stone ditto, two stone store houses, one frame barn and one log ditto."

 

It was not until 1849 or 1850 that either of the towns began to assume the appearance of a village, but from that time both increased in population and buildings as well as in extension of the limits of their towns. In 1851 Messrs. Davenport & Rogers purchased of Mr. LeClaire the remaining strip of land lying between the two towns of LeClaire and Parkhurst and laid it out into building lots. This gave a new impetus to business of all kinds. Mills and manufactories were erected. Mechanics of all kinds settled in the place, and many large brick stores were erected, so that in 1855 on petition of the inhabitants of both towns the legislature by act incorporated the city of LeClaire, including within its limits the town of Parkhurst.

 

At this date there were within the limits of this city no less than eleven dry goods stores, two clothing stores, one watchmaker, one saddler, two boat and provision stores, one bakery, five blacksmith shops, three wagon shops, one tin shop and stoves, one hardware store, one boot and shoe store, five churches, two copper shops, two tailor shops, two shoemakers, two livery stables, five hotels, one banking house, one printing office, two steam flouring mills, one steam sawmill, three lawyers, six physicians, two cabinet shops, candy shops and oyster saloons in any quantity, house and ship caprenters, stone masons and brick layers, a boat yard where steamers are repaired and keel boats made and repaired, and a ferry across the Mississippi river.

 

There are many interesting anecdotes connected with the early history of this township, llike many others in the country. All the pioneer laws of a new country were enforced here, and that same rigid regard for the rights of all was duly noticed. Some very rough specimens of humanity were of course among the early settlers, and many a kind heart covered up by a very rough exterior. It was deemed in those days a very dangerous thing for one man to "jump" another's "claim." The man who had the temerity to attempt such a thing was looked upon as likely to do worse deeds when opportunity presented. A rather laughable farce of this kind took place in September, 1837. At a meeting of the inhabitants of the settlement matters had been talked over as to the peace and good order of things, and the meeting about to adjourn, when a young man, a stranger, rather casually remonstrated, against any one holding more than one "claim," and not that, unless he lived on it He was from Hennepin, Ills., and most evidently had not traveled "the country all over," assuming rather more airs than seemed necessary for the occasion. His remarks were heard by one Simeon Cragin, a discharged soldier, and one of those unceremonious, backwoods, frontier, half civilized humans that lurk around the border settlements, who immediately presented himself before him and thus addressed him: "My name, sir, is Simeon Cragin, sir, all the way from Bangor, and you must leave these diggins, with but few remarks." The increasing rage of "Simeon" became alarming to the young Sucker and he found the shortest road possible to the state of Illinois, and we presume has never since visited Iowa with a view at least of "jumping claims."

 

There are also many striking reminiscences of the Indians in their sojourn both before and after the whites took possession of the country that might be interesting, and may be added hereafter. There are those now living in LeClaire who remember with what satisfaction the Indians often returned to thier forest home at the head of the rapids. In 1837 over 1,000 were encamped where the city now stands.

 

But while the people of LeClaire were thus busily engaged in building up a city, they did not forget in its earlier days when their sun of prosperity looked dark and uncertainty brooded over their undertakings, to turn their attention to schools and churches. Of the first little gatherings for prayer or of the first sermon in some small cabin where the littlle pioneer band first met we know nothing, but the first building erected for that purpose was the brick Baptist church in the summer of 1847. It was enclosed that autumn, and a small room in the basement finished off so that it could be occupied by the district school during the six days and on the Sabbath for divine service. This room, measuring about sixteen feet by twenty feet, continued to be the headquarters of the grammar school and the ballot box for some five years. Upon election days the school was let out to accommodate the officials in the weightier matters of the law. In 1849, the church being still weak in numbers and poor, entered into an agreement with the Congregational church to make the building answer for both congregations. The main edifice was to be finished, the original owners were to lath it, and the Congregationalists were to plaster it, and for so doing the latter were to have the use of it free on alternate Sabbaths for four years. In consequence, however, of delay on the part of the Baptist brethern in performing their contract, the church was not plastered till the pring of 1850, and the slips or pews were not put in until autumn. During this summer (1850) the audiences of the respective churches had to sit on seats constructed by laying rough joists on equally rough blocks-seats of the most rude and primitive kind. But it appears that the immigration into the flourishing village of LeClaire that summer was so great houses could not be found to contain them and a family occupied one end of the church as a residence-having a calico curtain separating kitchen, dining room and parlor from the sancturary.

 

The Rev. W. Rutledge was pastor of the Baptist and Rev. H. W. Cobb the stated supply of the Congregational church which occupied the edifice until the completion and dedication of their neat little church on the 22d of December, 1853.

 

The old Methodist church was built in the autumn of 1848, and was used in its unfinished state during the following winter, being used also, one end of it, as a carpenter's shop, the bench and tools crowded into one corner on the Sabbath. This building is yet standing and is rented for a district school. The first resident Methodist minister in LeClaire was the Rev. Joel B. Taylor. He was the first to occupy the parsonage, erected the same autumn as the church. A new Methodist church edifice was commenced in 1856, and completed and dedicated in August, 1857.

 

The old Presbyterian church was built, we believe, in 1850, at a cost of $500. In 1855 it was sold to the school district and converted into a schoolhouse. In the summer of that year Mr. T. H. Longbottom entered into a contract to erect a new church, which he completed the following season at a total cost of $4,180. The dedication services were held on the 15th of September, 1856. This building was destroyed by fire on the 2d of June, 1859, supposed to be the work of an incendiary.

 

The Congregational church was organized in 1849. Rev. H. W. Cobb was stated supply from June 1850, to December 1851, and the Rev. L. R. White from that date to June 1, 1854. The church edifice was erected in 1853, at a cost of $1,060, labor and material being at that time very cheap.

 

There are Catholic, United Presbyterian and Disciples' churches in the city, the statistics of which I am not able to give.

 

The "Bratton House" was commenced in the summer of 1854, finished the following season, and opened by H. E. and D. B. Brown in October, 1855.

 

A boat yard called the Marine Railway was commenced in March, 1856, and the first boat was hauled out the 18th of September of the same year.

 

18.      EBENEZER5 HAYWARD JR (Ebenezer4 Sr, William3, William2, William1) was born on 24 May 1736. He married HANNAH UNKNOWN.

 

Ebenezer Hayward Jr and Hannah Unknown had the following children:

 

i.        ELIJAH6 HAYWARD was born on 30 May 1754.

 

ii.       NATHAN HAYWARD was born on 31 May 1757.

 

iii.      PEARLLE HAYWARD was born on 27 Apr 1764.

 

iv.      DORITHA HAYWARD was born on 07 Mar 1767 in Bellingham, MA.